Water Damaged Treasured Family Keepsakes, Collectibles and Artwork

A short video, a new app and some good advice

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Click here for video

When treasured family history documents, photos, heirlooms, memorabilia etc are wet, in some way or another, priorities need to kick in. But what makes an item valuable enough to rescue?

Remember that value is more than just financial. “Don’t save that stupid thing of your mother’s” may indeed be the most important thing you have to pass down to children, has extreme value emotionally and for story-telling value. Add to your story of saving it from the flood and you will really make it an important item for future generations!

“The affection people feel for the art objects they own can be intense, and seeing those objects hurt or destroyed can be intensely traumatic. Take a step back, breathe, and assess yourself,” said Kala Harinarayanan,  Director of Environmental Health and Safety at the American Museum of Natural History, speaking at the Consortium on Recovery of Works of Art Damaged by Flooding. It wasn’t too surprising that a conference held at the Museum of Modern Art on how to deal with damaged artwork in the wake of hurricanes and winter storms, at times, felt like a group-therapy session.

At the same conference, renown industrial hygienist Monona Russol reminded people, “Among the most common and pernicious effects of flooding is mold. She pulled up a slide of a wooden sculpture covered in white mold—a victim of Hurricane Katrina. “One problem with mold, she said, is that it can take months to manifest itself. You might think you’ve dodged a bullet,” she said, “but you’ll have problems later on, especially in summer.”

Jim Coddington, a MoMA conservator, had been orbiting the scene like a priest at a church shelter.

“It’s true, some things may be lost,” he said. “But don’t make that assumption until you’ve been able to step back and get some expert eyes on it.”

There’s two (or maybe 3) parts to protecting and saving water damaged keepsakes: 1. Emergency actions and 2. Longer term preservation… and if you want, you can add a third step – restoration. Getting professional help may be your salvation.

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For emergency response and saving of “valuable” items that make up your family’s heritage, this app may be useful:

Emergency Response and Salvage Mobile App, is a handy mobile tool (which doesn’t work on a MAC) created by the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. Although designed for museum professionals, the free app offers useful information for anyone dealing with water damage.

To help keep precious items safe from the storm, here are some tips from experts:

  1. The Most Important Things First
  • People and pets are most important. Helping others is good for your soul.
  • Protect your property/home, equipment etc

  1. First thing – Get Organized
  • Make sure the gas and electricity are turned off and that the area is cleared for re-entry before you begin to assess damage.
  • A little extra planning at the beginning will go a long way—especially for insurance purposes. Document the situation as you go: Take pictures and keep notes for reference.
  • Cool and dry spaces are the best spots to examine objects. If you can, keep air circulating with fans.
  • A mixture of seven parts alcohol and one part water is effective for mold prevention, Steve Pine, a conservator at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houstontold the Houston Chronicle. But be mindful: Flood water can contain hazardous materials, so wear safety masks and gloves before handling anything that has been submerged.

  1. Take Extra Care with Framed Paintings and Works on Paper
  • Be careful with old frames. If they are wet, they will fall apart in your hands. It will cost $1,000’s to repair or replace.
  • Handling artwork on canvas can be very tricky especially is flaking paint is visible. BE CAREFUL. In the blink of an eye you can ruin the value, increase the repair costs by $1,000 or turn it to trash. See the video below!
  • Immediately take the work out of the frame, but do not separate paintings from their stretchers.
  • Keep wet paintings horizontal, with the paint-side up, preferably elevated. Keep them out of heat or sunlight.
  • If the work is stuck to the glass of the frame, do not try to peel it apart. Leave it in the frame to dry with the glass side down.

  1. Soggy Photos? Do Not Despair
  • Wet photographs that are stuck together should be immersed in clean water and swished around until they come apart. Then, lay them out to dry.
  • If the photographs are damp or partially wet, experts have a secret weapon to salvage them: the freezer. Interleave the photos with wax paper, place them in resealable bags, and freeze them until you can spread them out to thaw and dry. Textiles can also be frozen after being briefly submerged in clean water.
  • The air-dry technique is another tried-and-true method favored by museum conservators. Place an absorbent material (such as un-inked newsprint, paper towels, or blotters) underneath wet objects. Then, lay them out in a cool, dry space stocked with fans. Do not hang wet items, as they will be unlikely to remain intact.

  1. Freeze Your Wet Books, Too
  • If you have more than one book stuck together, rinse off any grime while the books remain closed. Then, pack them spine down in a re-sealable bag or sturdy container and put them in the freezer.
  • Individual books can be air-dried, standing upright.

More on this info at

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/top-conservators-hurricanes-1073048

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Click on picture for YouTube testimonial

Working nationwide on damaged murals and disaster response for artwork

Contact Info:

Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon, Oriana Montemurro, Painting Conservators

805 564 3438

faclartdoc@gmail.com

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Detached Historical Ex-Large Murals on Canvas Lined And Mounted – A Specialized Expertise Highlighted by National Organization of Art Conservation

Posted on September 1, 2017 by Scott M. Haskins

September’s Facebook cover image of the American Institute for the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) features, Professional Associate Scott Haskins (left in the photo) of Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Inc., who is also a former chair (for 6 years) of the Conservators In Private Practice (CIPP) specialty group. In the image, conservation professionals are lining three sections of the previously detached 280′ long mural by Buck Winn, “The History of Ranching in Texas”. The murals are in the collection of the Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. An action photo of the lining process (art restoration treatment) of three 30′ paintings is this month’s header.

Mr. Haskins works with painting veteran conservators Julie Stephenson, Oriana Montemurro, Virginia Panizzon and conservation technicians Diane Stevenett and Danielle Masters (who are also featured in the photo).  More information on the project and a short video can be found here: http://www.fineartconservationlab.com/murals/the-art-restoration-of-texass-most-famous-lost-public-art-by-the-most-famous-texan-artist-you-never-heard-of/

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The process of lining or backing a large canvas is a specialization that few art restorers have in the world. Mr. Haskins familiarity with the quality techniques and process were evident also from the recommendations David Coleman, Director of the Alkek Library Collection, received from other art conservators in Mr. Haskins’ favor when they were choosing an expert to undertake the work.

Dr. Coleman expressed confidently, “We couldn’t be happier with the work, FACL’s expertise, their customer service and communications throughout the process, the complete range of services to assist… it has been a completely positive experience and we would recommend Scott Haskins and FACL to everyone for art and mural restoration services no matter where you are located in the USA.”

The three 30′ sections of the mural required lead abatement, paint consolidation, distortion removal, rip repairs, lining, cleaning, fills and inpainting, and varnishing. FACL, Inc. is certified for toxic materials abatement such as lead and asbestos. There are several videos on YouTube that show the detaching process of murals and their reinstallation options. Here is the YouTube channel for mural restoration

videos:  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE1FF71CC598A8E79

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Oriana Montemurro inpainting murals by historic Texas artist, Buck Winn.

Art conservators that work in a private practices have businesses ranging from sole proprietorships to large companies, they provide support for clients such as artists, private collectors, galleries, corporations, museums, universities, and governmental agencies.

http://www.conservation-us.org/specialty-topics/conservators-in-private-practice .WaoEM63MyqQ

The importance of the History of Ranching is being rediscovered and recovered. The Texas State University chose Fine Art Conservation Laboratories after an exhaustive nationwide search for the expertise to deal with the serious preservation problems and in the hopes of ending up with a quality work of art to re-exhibit in the new Alkek Library on campus. The university owns 3 of the 11 sections that make up the 280 mural. As of the date of this article, the art conservation treatments on these 3 sections of mural are just completed. Plans to re-reveal the mural are in effect, but sadly the different parts of it have been separated… and are not likely to be reunited… so the full effect is lost. There is, however, very quiet discussions taking place regarding the other 8 sections of mural.

Buck Winn completed more than fifty projects in his life mostly between 1940 and his death in 1979, all on relatively large scales apart from his award winning postage stamp design for a three cent stamp in 1946. Some of his larger works are still available to view by the public in government and public buildings, however as new development has taken place an equal number have been sadly lost forever due to bulldozing and no care taken to recover the works before hand. There are funds and awareness groups urging for protection of these art pieces such as the Texas State Historical Association, stating that they are important works to preserve for the sake of art history and Texan history. Some of the murals no longer even exist in photograph form which is a real shame for future generations as well as all that appreciate his art work today. It is unclear why more care was not taken during reconstruction.

This story demonstrates the necessity for the preservation of architectural art (like murals) and also that loss of something precious can still happen in an “enlightened society” as ours if no one takes action to “make it happen.”. Losses and gaps such as the one in Buck Winn’s repertoire demonstrate a modern example of the problems we experience in looking at history. It is a difficult task to interpret the past as is, and the further you get from it and the more gaps that present the more difficult it gets. Especially in an age of technology and knowledge, as we are now, there is no real excuse for the loss or forgetfulness of anything like this.

Luckily, there are several societies and organizations fighting to save and promote Buck Winn’s legacy. These include the Texas Historical Commission and the Texas State Historical Association, which is one of the only bodies to have a decent biography about the man in question. Hopefully he will continue to be recognized for the artist and innovator that he was, that no further works of his will be forgotten or destroyed and thanks to experts like Fine Art Conservation Laboratories for their expert consultation service, nationwide on such projects and for their heroic efforts to do the actual mural protection, preservation and art restoration.

Mural Conservation Contact info:

Scott M. Haskins, Oriana Montemurro, Virginia Panizzon Art Conservators

805 564 3438 faclartdoc@gmail.com

 

 

Videos showing the work of Fine Art Conservation Laboratories
If you live in Los Angeles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5K5CIUWVp8
If you live in Orange County: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHo5A9L_rVA
If you live in Los Vegas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6h-cU3TWD8
If you live in Salt Lake City: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COuMshFt9ek

#muralrestorationexpert #muralconservation #kenttwitchell #ScottMHaskins#antigraffiti #protectpublicart #artconservation #artrestoration#paintingrestoration #paintingconservation #fineartconservationlab #mural #publicart @kenttwitchell@muralsinthemarket @muralarts @muralfestival #murals @muralistanbul @muralsoflajolla @muralsdc@muralsofnashville @muralsofphoenix @muralsoftheworld @muralsoflascruces@muralsofcincinnati @lamuralseries @themcla #muralconservancyoflosangeles #muralart #muralarts#dipintimurali @fineartconservationlab

Rip Repair on Historic Oil Painting by Henry Chapman Ford, Santa Barbara, California

Vintage, historical oil painting Bishop Ranch – Glen Annie, Santa Barbara, CA 1875 by Henry Chapman Ford was very dirty, ripped and trashed. http://www.FineArtConservationLab.com Click on SEE MORE

Why we do NOT patch ripped paintings: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOk0vk3w5zs

Contact info

Art conservators: Scott M. Haskins, Oriana Montemurro, Virginia Panizzon 805 570 4140 faclartdoc@gmail.com

Historical notes

Lots of vintage oil paintings pass my way for conservation with a dramatic story attached and so it was with this landscape that was ripped to shreds. Like many old paintings, it had old brown brittle ripped wrapping paper on the back… it looked like it had been through a war… and perhaps it had, of sorts.

The artwork in this story was part of “a pile of paintings” found in a storage shed, the damaged dirty oil painting had been thrown away… then fished out and “thrown into a deal” with an art dealer who bought the whole pile. Horse-traded along with other items twice more, it finally ended up in my hands to “save it if you can.” Well, saving and preserving art is what we do! It’s especially satisfying if its historic. Wouldn’t saving and preserving history for future generations give you the good worthwhile feeling of being socially conscientious?

Carefully looking it over I removed the old paper on the back and saw an inscription on the back written in a handwriting style that I recognized! Actually, I was stupefied! This painting’s location was less than a mile from where I live.“ Bishop Ranch – Glen Annie, Santa Barbara, CA.” Wow, it was a California historical painting! I immediately looked on the front of the painting and in the dirty lower left corner was the barely visible monogram of renown early California artist and Santa Barbara resident, Henry Chapman Ford, with the date, 1875.

HCF and I are old friends! My efforts in preserving and restoring his highly desirable, valuable paintings began in 1978 when I moved to Santa Barbara. I was asked to help salvage from the outer darkness of “Pigeon Row” storage at the abandoned Mission Inn in Riverside, CA one of the most important historical collections of paintings… considered by many art historians as a National Treasure; The Missions of California… by Henry Chapman Ford. Since that time, we have done painting conservation treatments on dozens of other paintings by Ford. All this to say, by the time this painting of Bishop Ranch – Glen Annie came into my hands, I knew intimately the work of Henry Chapman Ford.

In Goleta, California a few miles up the coast from Santa Barbara between the exits on the 101 freeway of Glen Annie – Storke Rd and Los Carneros on the North side of the road is a beautiful open space with an old ranch house nestled in the trees. That property used to extend back into the hills and up a canyon. To the locals it is known as Bishop’s Ranch but historically it was known as the Glen Annie Ranch of Tecolotito Canyon.

Colonel William Welles Hollister fell in love with this Goleta Valley tract of land the first time he saw it in 1854 as he was on his way to San Francisco. In the 1860’s he returned to Santa Barbara, buying up several Mexican land grants, but couldn’t get the owners of the Tecolotito Canyon area in Goleta to give it up.

The land he lusted after was owned by Nicholas A. Den. But then in 1862, Den died suddenly at only 50 years old. Not long afterwards, the heirs of the Den estate were open to selling off property as they needed additional monies.

Hollister was so in love with this land and so anxious to get it that he hastily purchased 5,100 acres from the family for $10 per acre when the current market value was only 10 cents! He wanted it ASAP, and the Den family eagerly accepted his generous offer.

In 1870 things were going well on the ranch. With the date of 1875 on the painting by Henry Chapman Ford, it was possibly a commission during a prosperous time when homes were being added to the property and existing residences upgraded. For Ford, his visibility and notoriety were being enhanced by his undertaking of the painting of the romantic and historic Missions of CA, which he had begun the year earlier, in 1874. Ford received much notoriety and enthusiasm from the public throughout California for his work. Besides being a patron of the arts, Hollister also became one of Santa Barbara’s leading entrepreneurs and philanthropists, financing and developing such projects as the Arlington Hotel, the Santa Barbara News-Press, Stearns Wharf, and the Lobero Theatre. But winds of a legal war were blowing.

For the rest of the story, go to http://www.fineartconservationlab.com/disaster-emergency-response/rip-repair-and-saving-historical-painting-of-bishop-ranch-santa-barbara-goleta-by-henry-chapman-ford/

 

 

Testimonial for Mural Public Art Protection and Maintenance at BYU, in Utah

 

Varnishing murals, besides making them look their best, is an important way to protect and facilitate future maintenance (cleaning). Get expert advice: http://www.fineartconservationlab.com Click on SHOW MORE

Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon, Oriana Montemurro Art Conservators, 805 564 3438 faclartdoc@gmail.com

See many more examples of maintaining and protecting public art, consultation services and mural conservation and restoration services on this YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCemzUslcaXyj4KEx26bnLDw

Smoke Damaged Collectibles Paintings and Furniture – Santa Barbara Ventura CA – Art Restoration

 

Disaster Response of smoke damaged collectibles and art – testimonial from home owner in the Santa Barbara Ventura area, CA. For more info click on SHOW MORE More testimonials : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL41D80C1C65FF2CE7

This home owner’s disaster response company did not have a “vendor” on their list to whom they felt comfortable about entrusting the artwork, collectibles and furniture. So, they put it on the owners to find someone. The disaster response company, therefore lost out on the margin they would have earned on this $12,000 job. They also lost out on the good will and future recommendations by the home owner and the insurance company who were so pleased with the restoration work.

Fine Art Conservation Laboratories did an assessment in the beginning for the insurance company (State Farm was very good with this claim), answered directly all the questions and worries of the owners, picked up and redelivered the completed work after all was done to the owner’s satisfaction.

http://www.FineArtConservationLab.com

Contact Info:

Art Conservators at Fine Art Conservation Laboratories (FACL, Inc.): Scott M. Haskins, Oriana Montemurro, Virginia Panizzon. Andrew Jacobs is the Disaster Response Coordinator 805 564 3438 faclartdoc@gmail.com

Keywords

faclinc, State Farm Insurance, art conservation, art restoration, painting restoration, painting conservation, collectibles, smoke damaged art, smoke damaged collectibles, disaster response,

Montreal, Canada GIN Business Conference 2017

 

Our business club meeting in Montreal Canada. See our meeting video in Aruba:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DR58qNIpQXk&spfreload=10  Click on SHOW MORE

 

See a dream building activity on a speedway in a Ferrari: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANF2L_ISs60&spfreload=10

 

Want to talk about GIN? Call Scott M. Haskins 805 570 4140 or faclartdoc@gmail.com

Public Art Mural Protection and Maintenance Applying an Anti Graffiti Coating

 

Mural capabilities list: http://www.FineArtConservationLab.com This video presents the idea of the importance of public art protection and maintenance. Click on SHOW MORE

 

The choice of resin and the technique of application can and should vary depending on the type and technique of the art being protected, its accessibility (ease of maintenance) and input from the artist if possible. All of these variable cannot be presented properly in a video. Call to discuss your questions.

 

Contact info:

Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon, Oriana Montemurro Art Conservators 805 564 3438 office, faclartdoc@gmail.com , http://www.fineartconservationlab.com/murals/mural-restoration-expert-appointed-by-the-city-of-los-angeles/

 

Kent Twitchell, Mural Artist 310 709 2037 kentsart1@yahoo.com  http://www.kenttwitchell.org , http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-ca-cm-kent-twitchell-la-murals-20150705-story.html

 

FACL

Kent Twitchell

protecting public art

maintaining public art

art conservation

art restoration

mural conservation

mural restoration

anti graffiti

anti-graffiti

clean a mural

Scott M. Haskins

Art conservator

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Cleaning and Varnishing Paintings at BYU Good info for Art Collectors

 

Short video tour of painting conservation lab: http://www.FineArtConservationLab.com Click on SHOW MORE

See other clients in Utah: http://www.fineartconservationlab.com

Contact information: Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon, Oriana Montemurro art conservators 805 564 3438, faclartdoc@gmail.com

Click here for other Mormon Art Conservation related articles: http://www.MormonArtConservation.com

 

Restore a Painting: do the minimal amount of work or make it look its best?

Restore a Painting: do the minimal amount of work or make it look its best?  (See the short video testimonial)

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Virginia Panizzon, Art Conservator

Restoring a vintage oil painting often involves options of treatments to choose from. If you are not experienced in dealing with a painting conservator and choosing art restoration services, you may very understandably wonder what is the best thing for the painting.

The financial value of the artwork may be a guide by which collectors and curators make decisions for the conservation and preservation of their artwork. However, value is not always only given by its monetary reclaim. Historical value and personal or emotional value also give people good reasons to preserve their heirlooms and collectibles.

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Before removal of overpainting restoration in water

A professional art conservator can be a valuable consultant for you to make good decisions regarding your artwork. A good example would be in trying to decide whether it is in the best interest of the artwork to have everything possible done to restore the painting, like when a painting has had a lot of previous restorations. For a number of reasons, this may motivate only a partial restoration treatment.

Consider, for instance that it is very important to address the preservation problems before dealing with the aesthetic issues. For example, if a client doesn’t want to spend much money but they want to preserve the painting and if a painting is very dirty and flaking; we will forego the cleaning but stabilize the flaking in the best interest of preserving the artwork. Its easy to see how the stabilization of the unstable paint is most important.

We recently received a historical maritime painting with a lighthouse in the distance from c.1895. It had extensive multiple previous restorations. Several large rips and holes had been repaired (and were still quite visible), a very poor quality cleaning had been done (maybe more than once) unevenly removing a very discolored varnish. Extensive over-abundant repainting (retouching) changed original features over most of the painting.

Even though it looked pretty rough, the general condition of the artwork was stable. In other words, there was no flaking or other signs of falling apart. The particular feature that really bothered the owner was the dark repainting of the water in the foreground which eliminated the water details and the owner said it looked to her like “the ship was sailing on land.” Click here to see the short video testimonial

So, in this case, our client’s primary concern was to clean the water in the foreground and recuperate the details of the water.  It was not possible to clean the entire painting without removing all the previous retouchings and exposing all the extensive damage and increasing the budget dramatically. While doing a complete restoration was definitely possible, it didn’t make sense to the owner given the financial value of the painting.

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After removal of repainting of the water (a previous restoration)

The owner may have made a different decision if this had been her grandfather’s ship or if her ancestor’s had immigrated on this ship. So, you can see there are different motivations for decisions. As long as the artwork is stable, the decision about the appearance is subjective.

The photo below is the grandmother of the present owner. It was sent to a well advertised Russian immigrant restorer who repainted the portrait. Horrified, the only option was to try and recoup all of the original by removing all of the oil paint repainting. So, in this case, the motivation for a complete and proper painting conservation treatment was justified by the owner independent of the financial value.

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Left: Restoration by Russian restorer meant repainting with oil paint.

Right: After repainting removal and recovery of original 19th century portrait.

Professional art conservation adheres to standards of practice and ethics that focus on the original nature and integrity of the artwork and the business practices with clients.

 

See a short video tour of Fine Art Conservation Laboratories:

http://www.FineArtConservationLab.com.

Call us to discuss your questions. Free evaluations at your home or business and pick up and delivery in So. Cal, Las Vegas, Salt Lake City. Or we can help you ship. Highest quality professional art conservation work, standards of practice and ethic.  Damaged art insurance claims.

Click here for other testimonials:

http://www.fineartconservationlab.com/testimonials/

We work with disaster response companies and insurance companies.

Contact info

Scott M. Haskins, Virginia Panizzon, Oriana Montemurro, Art Conservators

805 564 3438 office

805 570 4140 mobile

faclartdoc@gmail.com

oil painting restoration, painting conservation, art conservation, art restoration, restore a painting, rip repair, clean a painting, family heirloom, collectible, Scott Haskins, Oriana Montemurro, Virginia Panizzon, Fine Art Conservation Laboratories